Friday, November 8, 2019

The Importance of Narrative Voice and Dialogue Essay Example

The Importance of Narrative Voice and Dialogue Essay Example The Importance of Narrative Voice and Dialogue Essay The Importance of Narrative Voice and Dialogue Essay In a continuous essay of not more than 1,000 words, analyse this passage, discussing how narrative voice and dialogue are important elements in the creation of meaning in the passage. Throughout the passage from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, the author provides many ways to establish the creation of meaning through the use of dialogue and narrative voice. Austen allows the reader insight into the nature of the characters by us of dialogue, in which we see how the characters interact with each other. Austen also uses narrative, focalization, discourse and punctuation to further develop the characters and create familiarity between them and the reader. I hope to analyse the ways in which she does this and the meaning that is consequently created. The narration within the passage is omniscient. The narrator knows the actions, thoughts, words and feelings of not only the characters but also gives the reader insight into the society attitude to the engagement of Jane and Bingley; â€Å"The Bennets were speedily pronounced to be the luckiest family in the world†. The understated way in which the narrator ‘tells’ the reader this using the omniscient voice, allows the reader to absorb the information in a detached way; giving them the impression of a small, judgmental community who are limited in their imagination. This has the effect of enriching the reader’s understanding of the characters that live within the community. In contrast, we are dramatically ‘shown’ by the narrator Mrs Bennet’s reaction, â€Å"Why he has four or five thousand a year†. The litter of exclamation marks in the paragraph convey Mrs Bennet’s excitement, and the reader may judge that Mrs Bennet is shallow and slightly silly. The reader’s judgment is qualified by the fact that Mr Bennet does not reply to this utterance, and perhaps has the opinion that it is an exaggerated response and not worthy of reply. However, the narrator lets us know that while Mrs Bennet’s speech is worthy of judgement; it is an acceptable perspective shared by the society in which she lived and therefore perhaps, nudges the reader to judge them both harshly or conversely understand and excuse her. The society view within the passage, that the good marriage of a daughter is the luck of a family conveys an impression of realism. Mrs Bennet’s speech which features Bingley’s money and good looks, (not mentioning his character at all) also compounds the preconception that in this era these values were considered important before all other virtues. Conversely, the way in which the Bennets are described as being the â€Å"luckiest family in the world† has a quality of romance or a fairy tale/dream ending. Realism and romance are therefore both used to convey the ‘good fortune’ of the family and its implications. The omniscient narrator conveys the point of view of the characters Mary and Kitty to their sister’s engagement through the use of free indirect speech – â€Å"Mary petitioned Kitty begged very hard † this has the effect of giving the reader insight into the nature of the two sisters – they may conclude that Mary is the more staid, scholarly sister and Kitty frivolous, even the names of the characters affirms this. This characterization enables the reader form an opinion on the characters and in doing so gets more involved in the plot. Much of the passage is made up of direct speech between Jane and Elizabeth, this dialogue has the effect of conveying the closeness between the two sisters. The dialogue is interjected with omniscient narration that portrays Elizabeth’s inner thoughts and relief that Bingley had not told Jane of Darcy’s involvement in their previous estrangement â€Å"Elizabeth was pleased†. This has the effect of involving the reader and establishing affection for the character. The reader is privy to thoughts and events that not even her sister is aware of and is therefore complicit in the omission, sharing a secret with Elizabeth; thus drawing the reader to the character and into the narrative. The narrative in the passage is focalized mainly through Elizabeth. It is from her point of view that we observe the events following Jane and Bingley’s engagement, â€Å"Elizabeth had now but little time she found herself useful † this focalization causes the reader to identify with Elizabeth and become fond of her as her character and opinions are expressed. In the dialogue that follows, Jane is predictably extolling the virtues of Bingley and asserting her happiness, â€Å"certainly the most fortunate creature.. † Elizabeth’s response to this gives us insight into the way in which her character and the plot may develop. Elizabeth asserts that â€Å"till I have your disposition I never can have your happiness.. † It is possible that she believes that the good nature of her sister and lack of pride is key to her happiness (alternatively she is being ironic, knowing that she would not be happy with a ‘Bingley’ unless she had a similar temperament to Jane). She is pleased that her sister does not know about Darcy’s interference in her courtship with Bingley as she believes that this would â€Å"prejudice her against him† This could be a significant moment in the plot as pride and prejudice have been keeping Darcy and Elizabeth from finding happiness with each other. The intention to cease prejudice and pride causes the reader to sense and anticipate a happy conclusion, therefore eagerly reads on. The suggestion of moral self knowledge by which means Elizabeth may improve her prospects is showing the reader that reflection and change is required for evolvement. It also shows the dynamic quality of her character. The passage also lets the reader know that Jane’s character has changed over the course of the book â€Å"the most unforgiving speech that I have ever heard you utter. † Experience has led her to treat Miss Bingley with caution, this has the effect of humanizing the character of Jane and making her less static and one dimensional. It also gives the reader no doubt as to the feelings of Elizabeth towards Miss Bingley â€Å"Good girl! It would vex me indeed. the dupe of Miss Bingley’s pretend regard† As Elizabeth is the focalized character, the reader takes this judgement as a fair and accurate one and the poor opinion of Miss Bingley is assumed with no other evidence to confirm it. In conclusion, the narrative voice and dialogue within the passage affords a wealth of meaning. It is possible to study and form opinion on the characters and the environment in which they lived, by the author’s use of characterization. The use of narrative and the In a continuous essay of not more than 1,000 words, analyse this passage, discussing how narrative voice and dialogue are important elements in the creation of meaning in the passage. Throughout the passage from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, the author provides many ways to establish the creation of meaning through the use of dialogue and narrative voice. Austen allows the reader insight into the nature of the characters by us of dialogue, in which we see how the characters interact with each other. Austen also uses narrative, focalization, discourse and punctuation to further develop the characters and create familiarity between them and the reader. I hope to analyse the ways in which she does this and the meaning that is consequently created. The narration within the passage is omniscient. The narrator knows the actions, thoughts, words and feelings of not only the characters but also gives the reader insight into the society attitude to the engagement of Jane and Bingley; â€Å"The Bennets were speedily ronounced to be the luckiest family in the world†. The understated way in which the narrator ‘tells’ the reader this using the omniscient voice, allows the reader to absorb the information in a detached way; giving them the impression of a small, judgmental community who are limited in their imagination. This has the effect of enriching the reader’s understanding of the characters that live within the community. In contrast, we are dramatically †˜shown’ by the narrator Mrs Bennet’s reaction, â€Å"Why he has four or five thousand a year†. The litter of exclamation marks in the paragraph convey Mrs Bennet’s excitement, and the reader may judge that Mrs Bennet is shallow and slightly silly. The reader’s judgment is qualified by the fact that Mr Bennet does not reply to this utterance, and perhaps has the opinion that it is an exaggerated response and not worthy of reply. However, the narrator lets us know that while Mrs Bennet’s speech is worthy of judgement; it is an acceptable perspective shared by the society in which she lived and therefore perhaps, nudges the reader to judge them both harshly or conversely understand and excuse her. The society view within the passage, that the good marriage of a daughter is the luck of a family conveys an impression of realism. Mrs Bennet’s speech which features Bingley’s money and good looks, (not mentioning his character at all) also compounds the preconception that in this era these values were considered important before all other virtues. Conversely, the way in which the Bennets are described as being the â€Å"luckiest family in the world† has a quality of romance or a fairy tale/dream ending. Realism and romance are therefore both used to convey the ‘good fortune’ of the family and its implications. The omniscient narrator conveys the point of view of the characters Mary and Kitty to their sister’s engagement through the use of free indirect speech – â€Å"Mary petitioned Kitty begged very hard † this has the effect of giving the reader insight into the nature of the two sisters – they may conclude that Mary is the more staid, scholarly sister and Kitty frivolous, even the names of the characters affirms this. This characterization enables the reader form an opinion on the characters and in doing so gets more involved in the plot. Much of the passage is made up of direct speech between Jane and Elizabeth, this dialogue has the effect of conveying the closeness between the two sisters. The dialogue is interjected with omniscient narration that portrays Elizabeth’s inner thoughts and relief that Bingley had not told Jane of Darcy’s involvement in their previous estrangement â€Å"Elizabeth was pleased†. This has the effect of involving the reader and establishing affection for the character. The reader is privy to thoughts and events that not even her sister is aware of and is therefore complicit in the omission, sharing a secret with Elizabeth; thus drawing the reader to the character and into the narrative. The narrative in the passage is focalized mainly through Elizabeth. It is from her point of view that we observe the events following Jane and Bingley’s engagement, â€Å"Elizabeth had now but little time she found herself useful † this focalization causes the reader to identify with Elizabeth and become fond of her as her character and opinions are expressed. In the dialogue that follows, Jane is predictably extolling the virtues of Bingley and asserting her happiness, â€Å"certainly the most fortunate creature.. † Elizabeth’s response to this gives us insight into the way in which her character and the plot may develop. Elizabeth asserts that â€Å"till I have your disposition I never can have your happiness.. † It is possible that she believes that the good nature of her sister and lack of pride is key to her happiness (alternatively she is being ironic, knowing that she would not be happy with a ‘Bingley’ unless she had a similar temperament to Jane). She is pleased that her sister does not know about Darcy’s interference in her courtship with Bingley as she believes that this would â€Å"prejudice her against him† This could be a significant moment in the plot as pride and prejudice have been keeping Darcy and Elizabeth from finding happiness with each other. The intention to cease prejudice and pride causes the reader to sense and anticipate a happy conclusion, therefore eagerly reads on. The suggestion of moral self knowledge by which means Elizabeth may improve her prospects is showing the reader that reflection and change is required for evolvement. It also shows the dynamic quality of her character. The passage also lets the reader know that Jane’s character has changed over the course of the book â€Å"the most unforgiving speech that I have ever heard you utter. † Experience has led her to treat Miss Bingley with caution, this has the effect of humanizing the character of Jane and making her less static and one dimensional. It also gives the reader no doubt as to the feelings of Elizabeth towards Miss Bingley â€Å"Good girl! It would vex me indeed. the dupe of Miss Bingley’s pretend regard† As Elizabeth is the focalized character, the reader takes this judgement as a fair and accurate one and the poor opinion of Miss Bingley is assumed with no other evidence to confirm it. In conclusion, the narrative voice and dialogue within the passage affords a wealth of meaning. It is possible to study and form opinion on the characters and the environment in which they lived, by the author’s use of characterization. The use of narrative and the In a continuous essay of not more than 1,000 words, analyse this passage, discussing how narrative voice and dialogue are important elements in the creation of meaning in the passage. Throughout the passage from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, the author provides many ways to establish the creation of meaning through the use of dialogue and narrative voice. Austen allows the reader insight into the nature of the characters by us of dialogue, in which we see how the characters interact with each other. Austen also uses narrative, focalization, discourse and punctuation to further develop the characters and create familiarity between them and the reader. I hope to analyse the ways in which she does this and the meaning that is consequently created. The narration within the passage is omniscient. The narrator knows the actions, thoughts, words and feelings of not only the characters but also gives the reader insight into the society attitude to the engagement of Jane and Bingley; â€Å"The Bennets were speedily pronounced to be the luckiest family in the world†. The understated way in which the narrator ‘tells’ the reader this using the omniscient voice, allows the reader to absorb the information in a detached way; giving them the impression of a small, judgmental community who are limited in their imagination. This has the effect of enriching the reader’s understanding of the characters that live within the community. In contrast, we are dramatically ‘shown’ by the narrator Mrs Bennet’s reaction, â€Å"Why he has four or five thousand a year†. The litter of exclamation marks in the paragraph convey Mrs Bennet’s excitement, and the reader may judge that Mrs Bennet is shallow and slightly silly. The reader’s judgment is qualified by the fact that Mr Bennet does not reply to this utterance, and perhaps has the opinion that it is an exaggerated response and not worthy of reply. However, the narrator lets us know that while Mrs Bennet’s speech is worthy of judgement; it is an acceptable perspective shared by the society in which she lived and therefore perhaps, nudges the reader to judge them both harshly or conversely understand and excuse her. The society view within the passage, that the good marriage of a daughter is the luck of a family conveys an impression of realism. Mrs Bennet’s speech which features Bingley’s money and good looks, (not mentioning his character at all) also compounds the preconception that in this era these values were considered important before all other virtues. Conversely, the way in which the Bennets are described as being the â€Å"luckiest family in the world† has a quality of romance or a fairy tale/dream ending. Realism and romance are therefore both used to convey the ‘good fortune’ of the family and its implications. The omniscient narrator conveys the point of view of the characters Mary and Kitty to their sister’s engagement through the use of free indirect speech – â€Å"Mary petitioned Kitty begged very hard † this has the effect of giving the reader insight into the nature of the two sisters – they may conclude that Mary is the more staid, scholarly sister and Kitty frivolous, even the names of the characters affirms this. This characterization enables the reader form an opinion on the characters and in doing so gets more involved in the plot. Much of the passage is made up of direct speech between Jane and Elizabeth, this dialogue has the effect of conveying the closeness between the two sisters. The dialogue is interjected with omniscient narration that portrays Elizabeth’s inner thoughts and relief that Bingley had not told Jane of Darcy’s involvement in their previous estrangement â€Å"Elizabeth was pleased†. This has the effect of involving the reader and establishing affection for the character. The reader is privy to thoughts and events that not even her sister is aware of and is therefore complicit in the omission, sharing a secret with Elizabeth; thus drawing the reader to the character and into the narrative. The narrative in the passage is focalized mainly through Elizabeth. It is from her point of view that we observe the events following Jane and Bingley’s engagement, â€Å"Elizabeth had now but little time she found herself useful † this focalization causes the reader to identify with Elizabeth and become fond of her as her character and opinions are expressed. In the dialogue that follows, Jane is predictably extolling the virtues of Bingley and asserting her happiness, â€Å"certainly the most fortunate creature.. † Elizabeth’s response to this gives us insight into the way in which her character and the plot may develop. Elizabeth asserts that â€Å"till I have your disposition I never can have your happiness.. † It is possible that she believes that the good nature of her sister and lack of pride is key to her happiness (alternatively she is being ironic, knowing that she would not be happy with a ‘Bingley’ unless she had a similar temperament to Jane). She is pleased that her sister does not know about Darcy’s interference in her courtship with Bingley as she believes that this would â€Å"prejudice her against him† This could be a significant moment in the plot as pride and prejudice have been keeping Darcy and Elizabeth from finding happiness with each other. The intention to cease prejudice and pride causes the reader to sense and anticipate a happy conclusion, therefore eagerly reads on. The suggestion of moral self knowledge by which means Elizabeth may improve her prospects is showing the reader that reflection and change is required for evolvement. It also shows the dynamic quality of her character. The passage also lets the reader know that Jane’s character has changed over the course of the book â€Å"the most unforgiving speech that I have ever heard you utter. † Experience has led her to treat Miss Bingley with caution, this has the effect of humanizing the character of Jane and making her less static and one dimensional. It also gives the reader no doubt as to the feelings of Elizabeth towards Miss Bingley â€Å"Good girl! It would vex me indeed. the dupe of Miss Bingley’s pretend regard† As Elizabeth is the focalized character, the reader takes this judgement as a fair and accurate one and the poor opinion of Miss Bingley is assumed with no other evidence to confirm it. In conclusion, the narrative voice and dialogue within the passage affords a wealth of meaning. It is possible to study and form opinion on the characters and the environment in which they lived, by the author’s use of characterization. The use of narrative and the In a continuous essay of not more than 1,000 words, analyse this passage, discussing how narrative voice and dialogue are important elements in the creation of meaning in the passage. Throughout the passage from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, the author provides many ways to establish the creation of meaning through the use of dialogue and narrative voice. Austen allows the reader insight into the nature of the characters by us of dialogue, in which we see how the characters interact with each other. Austen also uses narrative, focalization, discourse and punctuation to further develop the characters and create familiarity between them and the reader. I hope to analyse the ways in which she does this and the meaning that is consequently created. The narration within the passage is omniscient. The narrator knows the actions, thoughts, words and feelings of not only the characters but also gives the reader insight into the society attitude to the engagement of Jane and Bingley; â€Å"The Bennets were speedily pronounced to be the luckiest family in the world†. The understated way in which the narrator ‘tells’ the reader this using the omniscient voice, allows the reader to absorb the information in a detached way; giving them the impression of a small, judgmental community who are limited in their imagination. This has the effect of enriching the reader’s understanding of the characters that live within the community. In contrast, we are dramatically ‘shown’ by the narrator Mrs Bennet’s reaction, â€Å"Why he has four or five thousand a year†. The litter of exclamation marks in the paragraph convey Mrs Bennet’s excitement, and the reader may judge that Mrs Bennet is shallow and slightly silly. The reader’s judgment is qualified by the fact that Mr Bennet does not reply to this utterance, and perhaps has the opinion that it is an exaggerated response and not worthy of reply. However, the narrator lets us know that while Mrs Bennet’s speech is worthy of judgement; it is an acceptable perspective shared by the society in which she lived and therefore perhaps, nudges the reader to judge them both harshly or conversely understand and excuse her. The society view within the passage, that the good marriage of a daughter is the luck of a family conveys an impression of realism. Mrs Bennet’s speech which features Bingley’s money and good looks, (not mentioning his character at all) also compounds the preconception that in this era these values were considered important before all other virtues. Conversely, the way in which the Bennets are described as being the â€Å"luckiest family in the world† has a quality of romance or a fairy tale/dream ending. Realism and romance are therefore both used to convey the ‘good fortune’ of the family and its implications. The omniscient narrator conveys the point of view of the characters Mary and Kitty to their sister’s engagement through the use of free indirect speech – â€Å"Mary petitioned Kitty begged very hard † this has the effect of giving the reader insight into the nature of the two sisters – they may conclude that Mary is the more staid, scholarly sister and Kitty frivolous, even the names of the characters affirms this. This characterization enables the reader form an opinion on the characters and in doing so gets more involved in the plot. Much of the passage is made up of direct speech between Jane and Elizabeth, this dialogue has the effect of conveying the closeness between the two sisters. The dialogue is interjected with omniscient narration that portrays Elizabeth’s inner thoughts and relief that Bingley had not told Jane of Darcy’s involvement in their previous estrangement â€Å"Elizabeth was pleased†. This has the effect of involving the reader and establishing affection for the character. The reader is privy to thoughts and events that not even her sister is aware of and is therefore complicit in the omission, sharing a secret with Elizabeth; thus drawing the reader to the character and into the narrative. The narrative in the passage is focalized mainly through Elizabeth. It is from her point of view that we observe the events following Jane and Bingley’s engagement, â€Å"Elizabeth had now but little time she found herself useful † this focalization causes the reader to identify with Elizabeth and become fond of her as her character and opinions are expressed. In the dialogue that follows, Jane is predictably extolling the virtues of Bingley and asserting her happiness, â€Å"certainly the most fortunate creature.. † Elizabeth’s response to this gives us insight into the way in which her character and the plot may develop. Elizabeth asserts that â€Å"till I have your disposition I never can have your happiness.. † It is possible that she believes that the good nature of her sister and lack of pride is key to her happiness (alternatively she is being ironic, knowing that she would not be happy with a ‘Bingley’ unless she had a similar temperament to Jane). She is pleased that her sister does not know about Darcy’s interference in her courtship with Bingley as she believes that this would â€Å"prejudice her against him† This could be a significant moment in the plot as pride and prejudice have been keeping Darcy and Elizabeth from finding happiness with each other. The intention to cease prejudice and pride causes the reader to sense and anticipate a happy conclusion, therefore eagerly reads on. The suggestion of moral self knowledge by which means Elizabeth may improve her prospects is showing the reader that reflection and change is required for evolvement. It also shows the dynamic quality of her character. The passage also lets the reader know that Jane’s character has changed over the course of the book â€Å"the most unforgiving speech that I have ever heard you utter. † Experience has led her to treat Miss Bingley with caution, this has the effect of humanizing the character of Jane and making her less static and one dimensional. It also gives the reader no doubt as to the feelings of Elizabeth towards Miss Bingley â€Å"Good girl! It would vex me indeed. the dupe of Miss Bingley’s pretend regard† As Elizabeth is the focalized character, the reader takes this judgement as a fair and accurate one and the poor opinion of Miss Bingley is assumed with no other evidence to confirm it. In conclusion, the narrative voice and dialogue within the passage affords a wealth of meaning. It is possible to study and form opinion on the characters and the environment in which they lived, by the author’s use of characterization. The use of narrative and the In a continuous essay of not more than 1,000 words, analyse this passage, discussing how narrative voice and dialogue are important elements in the creation of meaning in the passage. Throughout the passage from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, the author provides many ways to establish the creation of meaning through the use of dialogue and narrative voice. Austen allows the reader insight into the nature of the characters by us of dialogue, in which we see how the characters interact with each other. Austen also uses narrative, focalization, discourse and punctuation to further develop the characters and create familiarity between them and the reader. I hope to analyse the ways in which she does this and the meaning that is consequently created. The narration within the passage is omniscient. The narrator knows the actions, thoughts, words and feelings of not only the characters but also gives the reader insight into the society attitude to the engagement of Jane and Bingley; â€Å"The Bennets were speedily pronounced to be the luckiest family in the world†. The understated way in which the narrator ‘tells’ the reader this using the omniscient voice, allows the reader to absorb the information in a detached way; giving them the impression of a small, judgmental community who are limited in their imagination. This has the effect of enriching the reader’s understanding of the characters that live within the community. In contrast, we are dramatically ‘shown’ by the narrator Mrs Bennet’s reaction, â€Å"Why he has four or five thousand a year†. The litter of exclamation marks in the paragraph convey Mrs Bennet’s excitement, and the reader may judge that Mrs Bennet is shallow and slightly silly. The reader’s judgment is qualified by the fact that Mr Bennet does not reply to this utterance, and perhaps has the opinion that it is an exaggerated response and not worthy of reply. However, the narrator lets us know that while Mrs Bennet’s speech is worthy of judgement; it is an acceptable perspective shared by the society in which she lived and therefore perhaps, nudges the reader to judge them both harshly or conversely understand and excuse her. The society view within the passage, that the good marriage of a daughter is the luck of a family conveys an impression of realism. Mrs Bennet’s speech which features Bingley’s money and good looks, (not mentioning his character at all) also compounds the preconception that in this era these values were considered important before all other virtues. Conversely, the way in which the Bennets are described as being the â€Å"luckiest family in the world† has a quality of romance or a fairy tale/dream ending. Realism and romance are therefore both used to convey the ‘good fortune’ of the family and its implications. The omniscient narrator conveys the point of view of the characters Mary and Kitty to their sister’s engagement through the use of free indirect speech – â€Å"Mary petitioned Kitty begged very hard † this has the effect of giving the reader insight into the nature of the two sisters – they may conclude that Mary is the more staid, scholarly sister and Kitty frivolous, even the names of the characters affirms this. This characterization enables the reader form an opinion on the characters and in doing so gets more involved in the plot. Much of the passage is made up of direct speech between Jane and Elizabeth, this dialogue has the effect of conveying the closeness between the two sisters. The dialogue is interjected with omniscient narration that portrays Elizabeth’s inner thoughts and relief that Bingley had not told Jane of Darcy’s involvement in their previous estrangement â€Å"Elizabeth was pleased†. This has the effect of involving the reader and establishing affection for the character. The reader is privy to thoughts and events that not even her sister is aware of and is therefore complicit in the omission, sharing a secret with Elizabeth; thus drawing the reader to the character and into the narrative. The narrative in the passage is focalized mainly through Elizabeth. It is from her point of view that we observe the events following Jane and Bingley’s engagement, â€Å"Elizabeth had now but little time she found herself useful † this focalization causes the reader to identify with Elizabeth and become fond of her as her character and opinions are expressed. In the dialogue that follows, Jane is predictably extolling the virtues of Bingley and asserting her happiness, â€Å"certainly the most fortunate creature.. † Elizabeth’s response to this gives us insight into the way in which her character and the plot may develop. Elizabeth asserts that â€Å"till I have your disposition I never can have your happiness.. † It is possible that she believes that the good nature of her sister and lack of pride is key to her happiness (alternatively she is being ironic, knowing that she would not be happy with a ‘Bingley’ unless she had a similar temperament to Jane). She is pleased that her sister does not know about Darcy’s interference in her courtship with Bingley as she believes that this would â€Å"prejudice her against him† This could be a significant moment in the plot as pride and prejudice have been keeping Darcy and Elizabeth from finding happiness with each other. The intention to cease prejudice and pride causes the reader to sense and anticipate a happy conclusion, therefore eagerly reads on. The suggestion of moral self knowledge by which means Elizabeth may improve her prospects is showing the reader that reflection and change is required for evolvement. It also shows the dynamic quality of her character. The passage also lets the reader know that Jane’s character has changed over the course of the book â€Å"the most unforgiving speech that I have ever heard you utter. † Experience has led her to treat Miss Bingley with caution, this has the effect of humanizing the character of Jane and making her less static and one dimensional. It also gives the reader no doubt as to the feelings of Elizabeth towards Miss Bingley â€Å"Good girl! It would vex me indeed. he dupe of Miss Bingley’s pretend regard† As Elizabeth is the focalized character, the reader takes this judgement as a fair and accurate one and the poor opinion of Miss Bingley is assumed with no other evidence to confirm it. In conclusion, the narrative voice and dialogue within the passage affords a wealth of meaning. It is possible to study and form opinion on the characters and the environment in which they lived, by the author’s use of cha racterization. The use of narrative and the different perspectives this creates, envelopes the reader into the world of the Bennets. Even the punctuation used gives the reader vital clues, establishing a mental picture in the mind of the reader, drawing them into the story and giving it life. References Austen, Jane. (1813)Pride and Prejudice, Oxford World Classics (volume 111, chapter 13) Bibliography Austen, Jane. (1813)Pride and Prejudice, Oxford World Classics. Padley, Steve. (2001) Approaching Prose Fiction, Milton Keynes, The Open University. Walder, Dennis. (1995) The Realist Novel, Oxon, Routledge/The Open University. A210 (2006) DVD 1, The language of Realism I, The Open University, CDA5746, Track 3.

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